How Runners Can Benefit from Yoga

I’ve heard other running coaches say yoga isn’t “running specific” because it doesn’t mimic running and thus might not be worth an athlete’s time for cross training. However, just like any strength training or mobility training program, a yoga practice can be created to enhance specific areas of an athlete’s fitness.

5 Midday Yoga Moves to Get Energized

It usually happens around 2 or 3 o’clock. My eyelids get heavy. My head leans back as if reaching for the back of my chair. My bed is calling my name. I want to take a nap.

Why I Haven’t Run a Second Marathon Yet

I don’t enter races very often, but over the years I have run in many 5ks, a 10k or two, a 15k, and several half-marathons, and one full marathon.
What made my first and so-far only marathon possible was a confidence that I could run 26.2 miles, despite never having run even close to that distance before. It took me two years to complete my goal, but I just knew that I could do it.

Outdoor Yoga – Tips for Taking Your Practice Outside

If practicing yoga is important to you, but one or more things at home have been making it hard to get your practice in, maybe it’s time to change up your routine with an outdoor practice.

5 Yoga Poses for Busy Runners

Regardless of pace, one thing novice and casual runners tend to have in common is skipping their stretching, strength training or both. Regular stretching and strength training play a role in injury prevention. Adding one or two running specific strength workouts to your weekly training can help you stay a healthy runner. Yoga is probably not the first thing that came to mind when thinking about strength training, but it isn’t all about flexibility. Regular yoga practice can help you build strength in some muscles essential for running and better mobility. Try adding these five moves to your pre and post-run routine to get started.